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Posts Tagged ‘road trip wednesday’

I haven’t done a Road trip Wednesday in a reeeeaaallly long time. But I’m nearing (so near, so very very near) finishing revisions on my WIP, and I’m about ready to come out of the hole I’ve been in for far too long. And I couldn’t resist a chance to talk about the best book I read in November.

And that book is… The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall! Oh, how I loved this. Automatic classic.

I’ve been working on simplifying my writing, and maybe that’s why The Penderwicks struck me. Jeanne is a master of simplicity. Four sisters talk nearly nonstop, and nearly every dialogue tag is “said” (except Hound, the dog, whose tag is “barked”). “It’s Batty’s fault,” said Skye. “It is not,” said Batty. “Of course it is,” said Skye. “We wouldn’t be lost if…” You get the picture. But every sister has such an individual personality that flowery tags aren’t needed. The dialogue said it all. Nearly whole book takes place in one simple setting (a yard, no less!), but she fills it with the kind of childhood exploration that made it seem huge and thrilling.

The book is wonderful and whimsical and summery and lovely, and perhaps that’s why it’s a National Book Award Winner. Can’t wait to read the rest of them!

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 Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. In the comments, you can hop from destination to destination and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

This Week’s Topic:
How do you reward yourself when you meet your writing goals?It’s funny. I think back on the writing goals I’ve met – completing a chapter, completing a book, finishing the dreaded synopsis – and each time, it seems like the satisfaction of having completed it was the reward in itself. I might order a mocha, or my husband might take us out to dinner or something, but I guess I just haven’t really given myself a “reward” per se. (But perhaps I should start!)

As for the big goals, the future goals, the dream goals… well, here goes:

1. Top priority when I hit it big ;)… quit my day job. Best reward EVER.

2. A wonderful, amazing, incredible around-the-world trip. I want to see where my good friends Charlotte, Emily, and Anne once lived. Also Jane. And Charles. I want to walk on the moors. I want to go to Italy. And the Holy Lands. And Egypt. I’ve entered lots of contests and such, but alas, it seems that I’ll have to do it the old fashioned way and just become the next Suzanne Collins. 🙂

3. There is a certain person whom I would like to buy a van. And no, it is not me. But that has been on my list for a while.

4. For all other questions, see #1.

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Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. In the comments, you can hop from destination to destination and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

This Week’s Topic:
Some audiobooks are read by celebrities. Most recently, Cassandra Clare’s CITY OF FALLEN ANGELS was partly read by Ed Westwick of Gossip Girl.  So, if you got to choose a celebrity narrator for the audio book of your WIP or your favorite novel, who would it be and why?

The answer to this question is always, always Tom Hanks. WIP, favorite novel, cereal box… it should always be read by Tom Hanks. In the words of Tom as Forrest Gump, “And that’s all I’ve got to say about that.”

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Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. In the comments, you can hop from destination to destination and get everybody’s unique take on the topic. This Week’s Topic: Compare your first kiss with your favorite characters first kiss? YIKES. Well, this will be short and sweet. I think I’ll have to go with Ron and Hermione’s kiss here (notwithstanding my stance that it should have been HARRY and Hermione all along). It was sweet, and innocent, and the result of literally years of buildup. All their emotions into this one great little scene. And, of course, Harry’s reaction: “Oi! There’s a war going on here!” And Ron’s reaction to Harry’s reaction: “I know, mate,”… “so it’s now or never, isn’t it?” Well said, Ron. All this as opposed to my first kiss. With some random boy. I can’t remember his name. I do remember that it was gross. Nothing sweet or special about it. And I remember essentially hiding from him for the rest of the weekend. Which I’m sure is the way it is with most first kisses, and why I’m totally jealous of Ron and Hermione’s.
Of course, keeping in mind that Ron’s actual first kiss was Lavender Brown (ewww!)… it must be a rule, even in fiction, that your choice for a first kissing partner must be a completely stupid one.

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Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. In the comments, you can hop from destination to destination and get everybody’s unique take on the topic. This week’s topic is: What is the story of your best scar?

Well, I sat here for a few minutes trying to think of some quirky or interesting or exciting story from my childhood. But alas… I didn’t have all that interesting of a childhood, and my kid stories aren’t that exciting. My cousin Leslie and I spent almost every weekend/summer day together piled up on her bedroom floor reading Sweet Valley High books (much to the chagrin of her little sister Carrie). Not much chance for scarring there.

No, I have to say quite honestly that the best scar I have came five months ago in the operating room at our local hospital.

The doctor, having estimated the size of our baby and pronouncing that there was NO WAY Brennan was coming out on his own, cut a slit in me that, no lie, looks no bigger than a credit card. And out came the best little guy that ever did cute-i-fy the world. I’ve got scars from chicken pox, and scars from biopsies, and scars from giving blood, and… you get the picture. But the best scar? It gave me my whole world in a tiny little package.

Thanks, credit card scar! I’m proud to have you on my person.

Postscript: I used to wake up every Wednesday morning, drag myself out of bed and think, “Okay, you’ve made it through half the work week. You can do this.” Now I wake up every morning, leap out of bed and proclaim, “Today is ROAD TRIP WEDNESDAY! YESSSSSS!”

Ok, so maybe it’s not that dramatic, but still. My Wednesdays are a lot better now.

Postscript numero dos: I’ve posted an excerpt from my YA fantasy, Chronicity! Super pumped. If you haven’t read it yet, click on the Chronicity tab and check it out!

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Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway contributors post an answer to a weekly writing-or-reading related question. This week’s topic is: Assuming we make it through the 2012 apcalypse ;), what do you imagine the publishing world will look like 100 years from now?

Actually, the future of publishing is something I’ve thought about a lot lately. And I mean, a LOT. As an unpublished author, the questions I (and others like me) have are nearly limitless: Is it true that we’re on the cusp of a substantive change in the way people read/publish? Where do ebooks fit in the grand scheme of things? And where does that leave the good, old-fashioned hardback book?

I’m a book collector. I LOVE my books. I want my books hard bound, with a cover that’s not cheesy and that will look beautiful on the shelf. That’s because I sit and stare at them. Constantly. I love their smell and their weight and the way the spine crackles when you open them for the first time. So I hope – hope against hope – that in 2111, there will still be a place for them. And I do believe there will be, because I believe that there will always be people like me.

But I also believe that much will have changed. The world is flat now, and it’s getting flatter. Authors won’t want to wait for years for that “right agent” or “right publisher” to come along when they could publish and market their book immediately for themselves. What will that mean for the quality of the work out there? Well, that’s a question for another day.

Maybe books themselves will be different. They will almost certainly be interactive, with all manner of bells and whistles and “experiences”. We’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg with things like the 39 Clues series.

But what I wonder is, what will that mean for the simple pleasure of reading? Will my son, and his children’s children, even know what it means to pull out Peter Pan and just read it, with no virtual fairy dust or sword fights to make it exciting for them? And will those authors who dare to simply write stand a chance against all the hoopla?

I certainly hope so. Because, imho, the death of the traditional book will be the final nail in the coffin of our society’s imagination.

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Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway contributors post an answer to a weekly writing-or-reading related question. This week’s topic is: What books were you obsessed with as a kid?

SOO… here’s my first RTW post, in all its glory! Since I can’t choose one, I’ll choose three:

1. The Babysitters’ Club series. The entire series. I wanted to move to New York with Stacey, or paint with Claudia, or tan with Dawn… I wanted to BE a Babysitters’ Clubber. I got the whole set one Christmas, and I wore them out. Then I passed their tired-looking carcasses on to my adopted “little sister”, who managed to read around all the fraying and enjoy them as much as I did.

They were so REAL to a ten-year-old… spoken in a voice that I could understand. Ann Martin had a knack for making every one of those girls so alive to a middle-grade reader. Mad props to her.

2. Bridge to Terabithia. I believe I read BtT in sixth grade as a school requirement. It rocked my world. It was the first book I had ever read that punched me smack in the face with death. And not just death, but the death of someone my own age. I’ll never forget it.

3. Summer of My German Soldier. Boy, did I ever have a crush on that cute German POW! And being from the Deep South, I related to Patty like I had not related to any character I had read before. I could imagine myself doing what she did… doing the right thing, changing the world. I reread it a couple of years ago, and  fell in love (just a little bit) with Anton all over again.

Wow… what a trip down memory lane! Makes me want to go dig out Kristy’s Mystery Admirer!

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